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Quiz: See How Much You Know About Airspace With These 6 Questions

This story was made in partnership with Republic Airways. Check out the full series here. Ready to apply for a pilot slot? Submit your application here.

Can you get 100%?


  1. 1) What is an MOA?

    An MOA, or Military Operations Area, is an area defined by vertical and lateral limits in which airborne military training/operations take place.

    An MOA, or Military Operations Area, is an area defined by vertical and lateral limits in which airborne military training/operations take place.

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  2. 2) What are the Class G weather minimums at 12,500' during the day? (above 1,200' AGL)

    If you are above 1,200' AGL and above 10,000' MSL, regardless of the time of day, the weather minimums are at least 5 sm visibility and you must remain 1,000' above, 1,000' below, and 1 SM horizontal from clouds at all times. (FAR 91.155)

    If you are above 1,200' AGL and above 10,000' MSL, regardless of the time of day, the weather minimums are at least 5 sm visibility and you must remain 1,000' above, 1,000' below, and 1 SM horizontal from clouds at all times. (FAR 91.155)

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  3. 3) A TFR, or Temporary Flight Restriction, is put into effect for...

    A TFR can be implemented into the national airspace system for virtually anything if the FAA needs to restrict/prevent planes from flying over a particular area. Large sporting events, natural disasters such as damage caused by a tornado, or VIP movements such as the President, are all good examples of why a TFR might be issued. 

    A TFR can be implemented into the national airspace system for virtually anything if the FAA needs to restrict/prevent planes from flying over a particular area. Large sporting events, natural disasters such as damage caused by a tornado, or VIP movements such as the President, are all good examples of why a TFR might be issued. 

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  4. 4) What are the requirements to fly in Class A airspace?

    Before operating in Class A airspace, you will need to be on an IFR flight plan, have two-way radios onboard your aircraft as well as ADS-B Out and a Mode C transponder. (FAR 91.135)

    Before operating in Class A airspace, you will need to be on an IFR flight plan, have two-way radios onboard your aircraft as well as ADS-B Out and a Mode C transponder. (FAR 91.135)

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  5. 5) What is a Terminal Radar Service Area (TRSA)?

    Terminal Radar Service Areas are found at various Class D airports across the country. They are located at busy Class D airports that don't meet the requirements to be classified as Class C or Class B. Two-way radio communication with ATC is not required to fly through this airspace, however, it is highly recommended. Talking with ATC allows you to get traffic advisories as you fly through their airspace.

    Terminal Radar Service Areas are found at various Class D airports across the country. They are located at busy Class D airports that don't meet the requirements to be classified as Class C or Class B. Two-way radio communication with ATC is not required to fly through this airspace, however, it is highly recommended. Talking with ATC allows you to get traffic advisories as you fly through their airspace.

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  6. 6) What is the maximum speed you can fly at underneath the shelf of Class B airspace?

    You can fly at a maximum airspeed of 200 knots while flying under the shelf of Class B airspace. (FAR 91.117)

    You can fly at a maximum airspeed of 200 knots while flying under the shelf of Class B airspace. (FAR 91.117)

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Whether you're preparing for a checkride, or trying to knock the rust off before you fly to new airports, airspace is one the most challenging parts of flying. Sign up for our National Airspace System online course, and become an airspace pro today.


Ready to start your airline career? Want to fly an E-170/175? Get started and apply to Republic Airways today.


Corey Komarec

Corey is an Embraer 175 First Officer for a regional airline. He graduated as an aviation major from the University of North Dakota, and he's been flying since he was 16. You can reach him at corey@boldmethod.com.

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