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Quiz: 6 Questions To See How Much You Know About Stalls

Boldmethod

How much do you really know about stalls?


  1. 1) What happens when you increase the angle of attack past the angle at which the maximum coefficient of lift occurs?

    The airfoil will stall.

    The airfoil will stall.

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  2. 2) Adding flaps increases the ________ of the airfoil, which produces more _______ and delays airflow separation at _____ angles of attack on the airfoil.

    Adding flaps increases the curvature/camber of the airfoil. This produces more lift and delays airflow separation caused at high angles of attack.

    Adding flaps increases the curvature/camber of the airfoil. This produces more lift and delays airflow separation caused at high angles of attack.

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  3. 3) There is a _________ found on the top of an airfoil when air is forced to move from __________ to ____________. At high angles of attack, loss of energy to the boundary layer can create ________.

    The adverse pressure gradient forces air molecules to flow from low pressure to high pressure. As the angle of attack is increased, the boundary layer will lose its energy, and the adverse pressure gradient will take over causing the air molecules located in the high-pressure region to flow back to the low-pressure region causing airflow separation. 

    The adverse pressure gradient forces air molecules to flow from low pressure to high pressure. As the angle of attack is increased, the boundary layer will lose its energy, and the adverse pressure gradient will take over causing the air molecules located in the high-pressure region to flow back to the low-pressure region causing airflow separation. 

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  4. 4) You're on a checkride and your examiner asks you: "For a given configuration, your airfoil will always stall at the same what?" You tell them...

    An airfoil will always stall at the same angle of attack, which is known as the critical angle of attack.

    An airfoil will always stall at the same angle of attack, which is known as the critical angle of attack.

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  5. 5) This _______ device allows ________ air beneath the wing, to move into the _________ air above the wing, energizing the _________. This is called a ________.

    A slat allows high-pressure air underneath the wing to move into the low-pressure air above the wing to delay airflow separation by energizing the boundary layer.

    A slat allows high-pressure air underneath the wing to move into the low-pressure air above the wing to delay airflow separation by energizing the boundary layer.

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  6. 6) Which of these designs do aircraft manufacturers use to stall the inboard section of an airfoil first?

    Aircraft manufacturers often develop airfoils with wing twist, stall strips, cuffed wings, or a combination of all three.

    Aircraft manufacturers often develop airfoils with wing twist, stall strips, cuffed wings, or a combination of all three.

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Better luck next time...

You scored %. We know you can do better than that!.

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Well, that could have gone better...

You scored %. So close, but not close enough.

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You know your stuff...

You scored %. Keep it up.

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Corey Komarec

Corey is an Embraer 175 First Officer for a large regional airline. He graduated as an aviation major from the University of North Dakota, and he's been flying since he was 16. You can reach him at corey@boldmethod.com.

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