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Quiz: 6 Questions To See How Well You Know The Components Of An ILS

Live from the Flight Deck

It's one of the most common approaches you'll fly as an instrument-rated pilot.


  1. 1) The glideslope utilizes two frequency lobes that overlap each other. What are the two frequencies and how are they oriented?

    There is a 90 Hz lobe on top and a 150 Hz lobe on the bottom. When you are "on glideslope" you are flying right where the two lobes meet.

    There is a 90 Hz lobe on top and a 150 Hz lobe on the bottom. When you are "on glideslope" you are flying right where the two lobes meet.

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  2. 2) You are on your instrument check ride and your examiner asks you what the service volume of the localizer is. So you say...

    The service volume of the localizer is 10 nm within 35 degrees either side of the runway centerline and/or 18 nm within 10 degrees either side of the runway centerline.

    The service volume of the localizer is 10 nm within 35 degrees either side of the runway centerline and/or 18 nm within 10 degrees either side of the runway centerline.

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  3. 3) Let's say you are a CFII and one of your students asks you what the middle marker is for. So you tell them...

    The middle marker, which will flash amber upon reaching it, indicates a position approximately 3,500 feet from the landing threshold. This is also the position where an aircraft on the glide path will be at an altitude of approximately 200 feet above the elevation of the touchdown zone.

    The middle marker, which will flash amber upon reaching it, indicates a position approximately 3,500 feet from the landing threshold. This is also the position where an aircraft on the glide path will be at an altitude of approximately 200 feet above the elevation of the touchdown zone.

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  4. 4) If you cross over the threshold and were full-scale left or right deflection on the CDI, how far off centerline would you be?

    The localizer antenna is placed on the departure end of the runway at a specific distance from the threshold so that the course width over the threshold on the approach end is 700' wide. So, full-scale deflection would be 350' off centerline.

    The localizer antenna is placed on the departure end of the runway at a specific distance from the threshold so that the course width over the threshold on the approach end is 700' wide. So, full-scale deflection would be 350' off centerline.

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  5. 5) What are the widths of the localizer and the glideslope, respectively?

    The localizer width is 3-6 degrees whereas the glideslope width is 1.4 degrees.

    The localizer width is 3-6 degrees whereas the glideslope width is 1.4 degrees.

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  6. 6) The approach lighting system (ALS) is used to help transition you from instrument flying to visual flying. Which ALS is associated with red terminating and red side row bars?

    ALSF-1 has red terminating bars and ALSF-2 has red side row bars.

    ALSF-1 has red terminating bars and ALSF-2 has red side row bars.

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Better luck next time...

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Corey Komarec

Corey is an Embraer 175 First Officer for a large regional airline. He graduated as an aviation major from the University of North Dakota, and he's been flying since he was 16. You can reach him at corey@boldmethod.com.

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