To: (Separate email addresses with commas)
From: (Your email address)
Message: (Optional)
Send
Cancel

Thanks!

Close

Quiz: Can You Answer These 5 Fall Takeoff And Landings Questions?

Fall weather can be challenging...


  1. 1) You're flying into Flagstaff, AZ, planning to land on Runway 21. The METAR indicates:


    KFLG 241851Z 21010G24 10SM FEW050 FEW070 15/9 29.95


    If your normal final approach speed is 90 KIAS, how should you adjust your final approach speed to compensate for the wind gusts?

    When the current weather indicates gusting winds, you should add half of the gust factor to your approach speed. For example, 24-10=14, 14/2=7, 7+90=97knots. This helps to keep a greater margin between approach speed and stall speed.

    When the current weather indicates gusting winds, you should add half of the gust factor to your approach speed. For example, 24-10=14, 14/2=7, 7+90=97knots. This helps to keep a greater margin between approach speed and stall speed.

    1. 1-1
      Unchecked Checked
    2. 1-2
      Unchecked Checked
    1. 1-3
      Unchecked Checked
    2. 1-4
      Unchecked Checked
  2. 2) When the winds are gusting, what technique can you use to help stabilize your aircraft?

    When you land with less than full flaps, you have two advantages. First, your plane will have a higher pitch attitude, requiring less of a pitch change as you transition from final approach to touchdown. Second, you'll land at a higher airspeed, which gives you more positive control of the plane throughout touchdown. But keep in mind that more speed isn't always better. Flying an excessive final approach speed more than half the gust factor) can cause you to float and miss your landing point.

    When you land with less than full flaps, you have two advantages. First, your plane will have a higher pitch attitude, requiring less of a pitch change as you transition from final approach to touchdown. Second, you'll land at a higher airspeed, which gives you more positive control of the plane throughout touchdown. But keep in mind that more speed isn't always better. Flying an excessive final approach speed more than half the gust factor) can cause you to float and miss your landing point.

    1. 2-1
      Unchecked Checked
    2. 2-2
      Unchecked Checked
    1. 2-3
      Unchecked Checked
    2. 2-4
      Unchecked Checked
  3. 3) Taking off with frost on your wings can...

    Even a thin layer of frost on the upper surface of the wings can increase stall speed, increase drag by 40%, and reduce lift by 30%.

    Even a thin layer of frost on the upper surface of the wings can increase stall speed, increase drag by 40%, and reduce lift by 30%.

    1. 3-1
      Unchecked Checked
    2. 3-2
      Unchecked Checked
    1. 3-3
      Unchecked Checked
    2. 3-4
      Unchecked Checked
  4. 4) Your engine produces more power on takeoff in the fall due to...

    As fall approaches, the air temperature drops. Cold air is denser than warm air, so when it is introduced into the engine with fuel and ignited, it produces a stronger power stroke, increasing engine performance.

    As fall approaches, the air temperature drops. Cold air is denser than warm air, so when it is introduced into the engine with fuel and ignited, it produces a stronger power stroke, increasing engine performance.

    1. 4-1
      Unchecked Checked
    2. 4-2
      Unchecked Checked
    1. 4-3
      Unchecked Checked
    2. 4-4
      Unchecked Checked
  5. 5) As you're entering the flare during a crosswind landing, you need to _____ to maintain the runway centerline.

    As you begin your round-out and flare, your plane slows down, which also means your flight controls are less effective. Because your flight controls are less effective, you need to add more rudder to keep your nose aligned with the runway, and at the same time add more aileron to keep yourself from drifting off the centerline.

    As you begin your round-out and flare, your plane slows down, which also means your flight controls are less effective. Because your flight controls are less effective, you need to add more rudder to keep your nose aligned with the runway, and at the same time add more aileron to keep yourself from drifting off the centerline.

    1. 5-1
      Unchecked Checked
    2. 5-2
      Unchecked Checked
    1. 5-3
      Unchecked Checked
    2. 5-4
      Unchecked Checked

Well, that could have gone better...

You scored %. Time for some studying!

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
Pic

That was a little bumpy...

You scored %. Time for a quick refresher.

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
Pic

Nice landing!

You scored %. Well done.

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
Pic

Take the next step.

Do you have a perfect takeoff and landing every time? Neither do we. That's why we built our Mastering Takeoffs and Landings online course.

You'll learn strategies, tactics, and fundamental principles that you can use on your next flight, and just about any takeoff or landing scenario you'll experience as a pilot.

Plus, for less than the cost of a flight lesson, you get lifetime access to tools that increase your confidence and make your landings more consistent.

Ready to get started? Click here to purchase Mastering Takeoffs and Landings now.


Corey Komarec

Corey is an Embraer 175 First Officer for a regional airline. He graduated as an aviation major from the University of North Dakota, and he's been flying since he was 16. You can reach him at corey@boldmethod.com.

Recommended Stories

Latest Stories

    Load More
    Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share via Email