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Quiz: 6 Questions To See How Much You Know About Class G Airspace

These are some of the toughest airspace questions to remember...


  1. 1) What Class G equipment requirements are there below 10,000' MSL?

    In Class G airspace, there are no specific equipment requirements below 10,000' MSL. As long as you are outside of a Mode-C veil and below 10,000' MSL, you don't need a radio or a transponder.

    In Class G airspace, there are no specific equipment requirements below 10,000' MSL. As long as you are outside of a Mode-C veil and below 10,000' MSL, you don't need a radio or a transponder.

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  2. 2) What altitude does Class G extend up to at Airlake (KLVN)?

    Class G airspace ends up to, but not including, 700' AGL.

    Class G airspace ends up to, but not including, 700' AGL.

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  3. 3) You're flying west of KPGA. What are the vertical dimensions of Class G airspace at the black arrow?

    Within these boundaries, Class G airspace extends from the surface up to, but not including, 14,500' MSL.

    Within these boundaries, Class G airspace extends from the surface up to, but not including, 14,500' MSL.

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  4. 4) You're on the ground at Tulia/Swisher County airport (I06). The current weather is OVC013 and 1 1/2 SM visibility. It is 1400 local time. Could you depart for a local pattern flight?

    Weather minimums during the day below 1,200' AGL in Class G airspace are 1-mile visibility and clear of clouds. So, given the weather in this scenario, you are legal to practice landings in the pattern. That being said, you should always be cautious about flying VFR in low-ceiling conditions.

    Weather minimums during the day below 1,200' AGL in Class G airspace are 1-mile visibility and clear of clouds. So, given the weather in this scenario, you are legal to practice landings in the pattern. That being said, you should always be cautious about flying VFR in low-ceiling conditions.

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  5. 5) What are the vertical dimensions of Class G airspace at Sikes (KCEW)?

    The dashed magenta line represents Class E to the surface. So, Class G doesn't exist at this.

    The dashed magenta line represents Class E to the surface. So, Class G doesn't exist at this.

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  6. 6) According to the AIM, how far out should you start announcing your position/intentions when arriving at a Class G non-towered airport?

    The AIM recommends you start self-announcing at a distance of 10NM.

    The AIM recommends you start self-announcing at a distance of 10NM.

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Well, that was tough...

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You've got this Class G airspace down, for the most part.

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Nailed it!

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Want to learn more about airspace? Try our online airspace course here.

Corey Komarec

Corey is an Embraer 175 First Officer for a regional airline. He graduated as an aviation major from the University of North Dakota, and he's been flying since he was 16. You can reach him at corey@boldmethod.com.

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