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Quiz: 6 Questions To See How Much You Know About Landings

Boldmethod

Getting the plane into the air is the easy part. Now, let's see if you can safely land it.


  1. 1) You are practicing landings in your Piper Archer at Rocky Mountain Metro (KBJC). The current winds are 160@24 and the active runways are 12L and 12R. You are in the right downwind for runway 12R. When you turn right base, will you need to turn more or less than 90 degrees?
    View FAA Chart

    With the winds at 160@24 on downwind, without crabbing, your aircraft will be pushed towards the runway. So, to compensate, you will need to crab to the left. When you make the turn to base, you'll have to transition from a crab on downwind to a crab on base. This will require you to turn more than 90 degrees. Since the wind was pushing you towards the runway on downwind, on base, it'll be trying to push you further from the approach end of the runway. So here, you'll need to be crabbed to the right.

    With the winds at 160@24 on downwind, without crabbing, your aircraft will be pushed towards the runway. So, to compensate, you will need to crab to the left. When you make the turn to base, you'll have to transition from a crab on downwind to a crab on base. This will require you to turn more than 90 degrees. Since the wind was pushing you towards the runway on downwind, on base, it'll be trying to push you further from the approach end of the runway. So here, you'll need to be crabbed to the right.

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  2. 2) Referring to the wind velocity in the previous question, if you are landing on runway 12R, what percentage of the wind value is considered crosswind, and what is your approximate crosswind component?
    View FAA Chart

    If the wind is 45 degrees from the centerline of the landing runway, approximately 75% of the total wind velocity is crosswind. So, in this scenario, you have approximately a 45-degree crosswind with a wind value of 24 knots. So, 18 knots of crosswind is what you can expect on final.

    If the wind is 45 degrees from the centerline of the landing runway, approximately 75% of the total wind velocity is crosswind. So, in this scenario, you have approximately a 45-degree crosswind with a wind value of 24 knots. So, 18 knots of crosswind is what you can expect on final.

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  3. 3) You turn final and notice that you're high. You have flaps set full, the throttle is at idle and you still aren't descending quickly enough. So, you elect to do a forward slip. Describe the control placement during a forward slip...

    When performing a forward slip, you always want to bank into the wind. So, in this case, you have a right crosswind. To begin, smoothly apply right aileron to bank into the wind, while also adding in left rudder. At the same time, you want to maintain your final approach speed, so you need to add forward pressure on the control column in order to compensate for the increased drag. This is important so you don't put yourself at risk of stalling. When you've returned to a normal glide path to the runway, smoothly return the controls to normal.

    When performing a forward slip, you always want to bank into the wind. So, in this case, you have a right crosswind. To begin, smoothly apply right aileron to bank into the wind, while also adding in left rudder. At the same time, you want to maintain your final approach speed, so you need to add forward pressure on the control column in order to compensate for the increased drag. This is important so you don't put yourself at risk of stalling. When you've returned to a normal glide path to the runway, smoothly return the controls to normal.

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  4. 4) You're back on glide path, so you release the forward slip. But, you need to do something else now. How do you compensate for the crosswind, and keep your plane aligned with the runway centerline without sideloading the landing gear when you touch down? What is this maneuver called?

    A sideslip is a maneuver you will use on every landing that involves some sort of crosswind. It's easy. Use enough aileron (bank) into the wind to maintain the extended runway centerline while also applying enough opposite rudder so that the longitudinal axis of the aircraft is parallel to the runway.

    A sideslip is a maneuver you will use on every landing that involves some sort of crosswind. It's easy. Use enough aileron (bank) into the wind to maintain the extended runway centerline while also applying enough opposite rudder so that the longitudinal axis of the aircraft is parallel to the runway.

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  5. 5) You challenge yourself to a short field landing. You plan to land on the first centerline stripe past the 1,000' markers. What does the Private Pilot ACS specify regarding your touchdown point?

    The Private Pilot ACS states, "touch down at a proper pitch attitude within 200 feet beyond or on the specified point."

    The Private Pilot ACS states, "touch down at a proper pitch attitude within 200 feet beyond or on the specified point."

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  6. 6) After landing, when should your wind correction be taken out?

    Especially in light GA airplanes, you should keep crosswind correction in until you are safely stopped. This is incredibly important since one simple gust of wind can cause you to lose directional control, tip, or even become momentarily airborne again if the gust is strong enough.

    Especially in light GA airplanes, you should keep crosswind correction in until you are safely stopped. This is incredibly important since one simple gust of wind can cause you to lose directional control, tip, or even become momentarily airborne again if the gust is strong enough.

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That was rough...

You scored %. Better luck next time.

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There's room for improvement...

You scored %. Let's see 100% the next time!

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Nailed it!

You scored %. Nice work.

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FAA-KBJC X

Want to learn more about landings? Sign up for our Mastering Takeoffs and Landings online course here.


Corey Komarec

Corey is an Embraer 175 First Officer for a regional airline. He graduated as an aviation major from the University of North Dakota, and he's been flying since he was 16. You can reach him at corey@boldmethod.com.

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