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Quiz: 6 Question To See How Much You Know About IFR Emergencies

Boldmethod

Any emergency in aviation is significantly more challenging when you can't see outside. Do you know what you would do in these situations?


  1. 1) You are cruising in your Piper Seminole (twin-piston engine), flying a cross-country in IMC from Dubuque, IA (KDBQ) to DuPage, IL (KDPA). You reach for the propeller levers to sync them when you hear a loud bang and a swift yawing motion.


    What instrument do you use to determine a failed engine and what is a way(s) to confirm it?

    In a piston aircraft, you will always use the EGT, or the Exhaust Gas Temperature to determine the failed engine. This is because it gives you a definite, clear-cut answer, especially in IMC, as to which engine has failed. One will be producing hot exhaust gas, one will not. You can help confirm the inoperative engine through the rudder pedals (dead foot, dead engine), the inclinometer (the ball will be on the side of the operative engine), the inoperative throttle (moving it should result in nothing happening).

    In a piston aircraft, you will always use the EGT, or the Exhaust Gas Temperature to determine the failed engine. This is because it gives you a definite, clear-cut answer, especially in IMC, as to which engine has failed. One will be producing hot exhaust gas, one will not. You can help confirm the inoperative engine through the rudder pedals (dead foot, dead engine), the inclinometer (the ball will be on the side of the operative engine), the inoperative throttle (moving it should result in nothing happening).

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  2. 2) You are planning to fly a cross-country in IMC between Reno, NV (KRNO) and Sacramento, CA (KSMF) at a filed altitude of FL240.


    ATC says, "Citation 256YU, Reno clearance, you are cleared to the Sacramento airport via the PVINE 3 departure, HALLIE transition, then as filed. Climb via SID, expect FL220 10 minutes after departure. Departure frequency 126.3, squawk 3412. Advise when 2 minutes prior to taxi for flow into Sacramento."


    You depart and are climbing via the PVINE 3 departure when you experience failure of both COM1 and COM2 with no backup radios. What altitude do you continue to? The MEA in this area is 11,500' MSL.
    View FAA Chart

    When determining what altitude to go to, fly the highest of the minimum enroute altitude, expected altitude/flight level, or the last assigned altitude/flight level. In this case, they said expect FL220 in 10 minutes, so this is the altitude you should fly to.

    When determining what altitude to go to, fly the highest of the minimum enroute altitude, expected altitude/flight level, or the last assigned altitude/flight level. In this case, they said expect FL220 in 10 minutes, so this is the altitude you should fly to.

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  3. 3) You and friend are in a Piper Archer doing practice approaches in IMC to maintain your instrument currency when out of the blue, you get a warning message saying "BATTERY DISCHARGE." What is this indicative of, and what is your plan of action?

    A discharging battery is a sign that the alternator is no longer charging the battery, and it has more than likely failed. So, after running the checklist for an alternator failure, it might be crucial to shed nonessential electrical loads and divert immediately to the nearest airport.

    A discharging battery is a sign that the alternator is no longer charging the battery, and it has more than likely failed. So, after running the checklist for an alternator failure, it might be crucial to shed nonessential electrical loads and divert immediately to the nearest airport.

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  4. 4) You are shooting the LOC RWY 28C into Chicago O'hare (KORD) in a Cessna 208 with G1000 avionics. While being vectored onto the final approach course, you get red X's that appear on your attitude indicator and heading indicator. What system failed? Also, to aid you in flying the rest of the approach, what FPM should you aim for to maintain a 3-degree glide path from the final approach fix at SEIKA? Your approach speed/groundspeed is 100 knots.
    View FAA Chart

    You had an AHRS (Attitude and Heading Reference System) failure. You must now rely on your standby attitude indicator and the magnetic compass. To maintain a 3-degree glidepath from SEIKA at 100 knots, and easy rule of thumb is to multiple your groundspeed by 5. So, 100 x 5= 500 FPM.

    You had an AHRS (Attitude and Heading Reference System) failure. You must now rely on your standby attitude indicator and the magnetic compass. To maintain a 3-degree glidepath from SEIKA at 100 knots, and easy rule of thumb is to multiple your groundspeed by 5. So, 100 x 5= 500 FPM.

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  5. 5) You are flying between Chicago, IL and Cleveland, OH. If you were to experience a radio failure, how would you know what route to fly?

    If you have a radio failure on an IFR flight plan in IMC, choosing the route is simple. If ATC assigned you a route, fly that. Otherwise, you fly the vector ATC issued you to whichever fix or airway was given in the vector clearance, the expected route, or filed route...in that order. 

    If you have a radio failure on an IFR flight plan in IMC, choosing the route is simple. If ATC assigned you a route, fly that. Otherwise, you fly the vector ATC issued you to whichever fix or airway was given in the vector clearance, the expected route, or filed route...in that order. 

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  6. 6) You and your friend are flying a Cessna 182 at 10,000' (OAT -1 degrees Celcius) between Omaha, NE and Denver, CO. You start to pick up moderate icing and have no deicing equipment on board. What do you do?

    If you encounter unexpected icing, there are a few things you can do. If you have deicing equipment...turn it on. However, if that isn't an option, you need to get creative. Climbing or descending 3,000' from your current altitude can usually get you out of most icing, but it won't necessarily melt it off. In this case, your best bet would be to descend to a lower altitude, where the OAT is warmer. This will stop ice from accumulating as well as to assist in melting it off the aircraft surfaces.

    If you encounter unexpected icing, there are a few things you can do. If you have deicing equipment...turn it on. However, if that isn't an option, you need to get creative. Climbing or descending 3,000' from your current altitude can usually get you out of most icing, but it won't necessarily melt it off. In this case, your best bet would be to descend to a lower altitude, where the OAT is warmer. This will stop ice from accumulating as well as to assist in melting it off the aircraft surfaces.

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Better luck next time...

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You know your stuff...

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Corey Komarec

Corey is an Embraer 175 First Officer for a regional airline. He graduated as an aviation major from the University of North Dakota, and he's been flying since he was 16. You can reach him at corey@boldmethod.com.

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