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Quiz: 6 Questions To See How Much You Know About Stalls

Boldmethod

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  1. 1) Any point beyond ___________ is where __________.

    Any point beyond the critical angle of attack is where a stall occurs and the coefficient of lift rapidly drops. 

    Any point beyond the critical angle of attack is where a stall occurs and the coefficient of lift rapidly drops. 

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  2. 2) You are on your checkride and the examiner asks, "The airfoil will always stall at the same what?" So you tell them...

    The airfoil will always stall at the same angle of attack.

    The airfoil will always stall at the same angle of attack.

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  3. 3) You and your student are practicing power-on stalls in preparation for their Private Pilot checkride. You notice the student uses no elevator trim to help keep the nose high for the stall. After the aircraft stalls, your student lowers the nose and adds full power. In the attempt to lose minimal altitude, your student adds back pressure on the elevator, so the aircraft stalls again.


    What happened?

    In the attempt to bring the nose up too soon after the initial recovery of a stall, you can stall the aircraft a second time, known as a secondary stall.

    In the attempt to bring the nose up too soon after the initial recovery of a stall, you can stall the aircraft a second time, known as a secondary stall.

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  4. 4) Why is wing contamination an issue when discussing the topic of stalls?

    Wing contamination, especially on the leading edge, can disrupt airflow earlier than normal causing the aircraft to stall at an angle of attack much lower than critical. Also, excess weight on the aircraft will increase the speed at which the stall occurs.

    Wing contamination, especially on the leading edge, can disrupt airflow earlier than normal causing the aircraft to stall at an angle of attack much lower than critical. Also, excess weight on the aircraft will increase the speed at which the stall occurs.

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  5. 5) A stall with yaw can create which hazardous situation?

    A stall with yaw will cause the airplane to enter a spin. There are 4 phases. Entry, incipient, fully developed and recovery. 

    A stall with yaw will cause the airplane to enter a spin. There are 4 phases. Entry, incipient, fully developed and recovery. 

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  6. 6) Which factors could cause a stall to flatten?

    Adding full power will create a nose-up pitching moment which can flatten the spin. Another factor includes having an extremely aft center of gravity and a weight heavier than the acrobatic limits of the aircraft.

    Adding full power will create a nose-up pitching moment which can flatten the spin. Another factor includes having an extremely aft center of gravity and a weight heavier than the acrobatic limits of the aircraft.

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Better luck next time...

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Not bad...

You scored %. So close, but not close enough.

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You know your stuff...

You scored %. Keep it up.

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Corey Komarec

Corey is an Embraer 175 First Officer for a regional airline. He graduated as an aviation major from the University of North Dakota, and he's been flying since he was 16. You can reach him at corey@boldmethod.com.

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