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Quiz: 6 Questions To See If You Can Shoot An ILS Approach Into Charleston, WV.

Boldmethod

Charleston, WV is in the heart of the Appalachian Mountains. Do you think you can fly this approach?


  1. 1) You're flying in a Cessna 182 into Charleston, WV (KCRW). ATC tells you to proceed direct to Charleston VOR for the ILS to runway 23. Can ATC clear you for the approach upon reaching the VOR?
    View Jeppesen Chart
    View FAA Chart

    Yes. The HVQ VOR is called a feeder fix and is one of the three ways you can become established on the approach. The other two ways are through radar vectors or an initial approach fix.

    Yes. The HVQ VOR is called a feeder fix and is one of the three ways you can become established on the approach. The other two ways are through radar vectors or an initial approach fix.

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  2. 2) You cross over the HVQ VOR at 5,000' when ATC instructs you to track outbound on the 360 radial for spacing going into the airport. You start to pick up moderate icing on your plane and you are at the freezing level. The best case is to descend. You know that in an emergency, you can descend to the MSA of ______ and be clear of terrain. Also, at a minimum, how far above the terrain will you be?
    View Jeppesen Chart
    View FAA Chart

    The MSA (minimum sector altitude), in this case, is referenced off of the HVQ VOR. If you are tracking outbound on the 360 radial, you can descend to 3,600' MSL and be free of terrain. The MSA provides 1,000' terrain and obstacle protection in both mountain and non-mountainous regions within 25 nm of the navaid.

    The MSA (minimum sector altitude), in this case, is referenced off of the HVQ VOR. If you are tracking outbound on the 360 radial, you can descend to 3,600' MSL and be free of terrain. The MSA provides 1,000' terrain and obstacle protection in both mountain and non-mountainous regions within 25 nm of the navaid.

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  3. 3) The ice finally melted off, however, now there is a storm that is passing over the airport so you elect to hold at STILT until it has passed. ATC instructs you to hold at STILT at 4,000' and gives you an EFC of 1830Z. How fast are you allowed to hold here?
    View Jeppesen Chart
    View FAA Chart

    From the minimum holding altitude up to 6,000'MSL the speed limit is 200 knots. From 6,000'MSL up to 14,000'MSL, the speed limit is 230 knots. From 14,000' MSL and above the speed limit is 265 knots.

    From the minimum holding altitude up to 6,000'MSL the speed limit is 200 knots. From 6,000'MSL up to 14,000'MSL, the speed limit is 230 knots. From 14,000' MSL and above the speed limit is 265 knots.

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  4. 4) You're finally established inbound on the localizer which is on 110.3. Why is this frequency underlined?
    View Jeppesen Chart
    View FAA Chart

    This means that there aren't any voice transmissions over this frequency.

    This means that there aren't any voice transmissions over this frequency.

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  5. 5) You're shooting an autopilot coupled approach to practice managing the automation under IFR. When are you required to disconnect it on this approach?
    View Jeppesen Chart
    View FAA Chart

    In the notes, it states that an autopilot coupled approach is not authorized below 1,450' MSL. 

    In the notes, it states that an autopilot coupled approach is not authorized below 1,450' MSL. 

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  6. 6) What is the lowest you descend on this approach if you see the approach lights but NOT the red terminating bars at minimums?
    View Jeppesen Chart
    View FAA Chart

    FAR 91.175 states that upon reaching the approach minimums, if you see the approach lights, you can continue to but not lower than 100' above touchdown zone elevation. If you see the red terminating bars or red side-row bars, you can continue down to land.

    FAR 91.175 states that upon reaching the approach minimums, if you see the approach lights, you can continue to but not lower than 100' above touchdown zone elevation. If you see the red terminating bars or red side-row bars, you can continue down to land.

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Better luck next time...

You scored %. We know you can do better than that!.

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Well, that could have gone better...

You scored %. So close, but not close enough.

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You know your stuff...

You scored %. Keep it up.

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ILS-23-CRW-JEPP X
ILS-23-CRW-FAA X

Corey Komarec

Corey is an Embraer 175 First Officer for a large regional airline. He graduated as an aviation major from the University of North Dakota, and he's been flying since he was 16. You can reach him at corey@boldmethod.com.

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