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Ready For Summer Flying? Here Are 6 Questions To Test Your Mettle

Are you ready for summer flying? Here are six questions on performance and weather to test your mettle.



  1. 1) You're on the ramp and your altimeter reads 5,800'.  You pick up ATIS and change the altimeter from 30.10 inches Hg to 29.10 inches Hg.  What does your altimeter read now?

    Awesome! Your altimeter moves 1000' per inch of Hg - and it moves in the direction of the pressure change. If you dial a lower pressure, the altimeter shows a lower altitude. If you dial a higher pressure, the altimeter shows a higher altitude.  Why? Think of it this way: You're parked on the ramp, indicating 0' with the pressure set to 29.92.  The pressure suddenly raises to 30.92 inHg.  Your altimeter senses the additional air pressure and thinks you're 1000' lower, because there's more air pressure at a lower altitude. Now it indicates -1000'.  You update the altimeter, changing it from 29.92 inHg to 30.92 inHg, and it raises up to 0' again.

    Incorrect: Your altimeter moves 1000' per inch of Hg - and it moves in the direction of the pressure change. If you dial a lower pressure, the altimeter shows a lower altitude. If you dial a higher pressure, the altimeter shows a higher altitude.  Why? Think of it this way: You're parked on the ramp, indicating 0' with the pressure set to 29.92.  The pressure suddenly raises to 30.92 inHg.  Your altimeter senses the additional air pressure and thinks you're 1000' lower, because there's more air pressure at a lower altitude. Now it indicates -1000'.  You update the altimeter, changing it from 29.92 inHg to 30.92 inHg, and it raises up to 0' again.

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  2. 2) When the temperature increases, your density altitude:

    Awesome! Your density altitude increases.  When the temperature raises, the air becomes less dense, so the aircraft performs as if you're at a higher altitude.

    Incorrect: Your density altitude increases.  When the temperature raises, the air becomes less dense, so the aircraft performs as if you're at a higher altitude.

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  3. 3) You've set your altimeter to 30.00 inches Hg and it indicates 3,500'.  However, the actual pressure is 30.10 inches Hg.  What altitude are you really at?

    Awesome! Pressure decreases roughly one inch for every 1000' you climb.  You've flown from an area of lower pressure (30.00 inches Hg) to higher pressure (30.10 inches HG), so the pressure has raised .1 inch Hg, and you've climbed 100' to 3,600'.

    Incorrect:  Pressure decreases roughly one inch for every 1000' you climb.  You've flown from an area of lower pressure (30.00 inches Hg) to higher pressure (30.10 inches HG), so the pressure has raised .1 inch Hg, and you've climbed 100' to 3,600'.

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  4. 4) It's July 5th and the National Weather Service forecasts a fast moving cold front to cross over you later in the day.  What kind of weather would you expect?

    Awesome! Cold fronts lift the warmer air in front of them, and a fast moving cold front can cause a lot of convection. Severe thunderstorms may be pushed along ahead of a cold front.

    Incorrect. Cold fronts lift the warmer air in front of them, and a fast moving cold front can cause a lot of convection. Severe thunderstorms may be pushed along ahead of a cold front.

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  5. 5) How does your aircraft perform in high humidity, compared to low humidity?

    Awesome! Your performance decreases. Water vapor is lighter than air, so air with high humidity (lots of water vapor) is less dense than dry air - which decreases performance.

    Incorrect: Your performance decreases. Water vapor is lighter than air, so air with high humidity (lots of water vapor) is less dense than dry air - which decreases performance.

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  6. 6) You're coming in to land at your published approach speed of 65 KIAS, and it's 110 degrees Fahrenheit (43 Celsius) outside.  Is your actual (true) touchdown speed faster, the same, or slower than it would be on a cold, winter day?

    Awesome!  Your true airspeed on a hot day is actually faster than it would be on a cold day for a given indicated airspeed.  Since the air is less dense on a hot day, you need to fly faster to generate the same amount of pressure on the airspeed indicator.

    Incorrect. Your true airspeed on a hot day is actually faster than it would be on a cold day for a given indicated airspeed.  Since the air is less dense on a hot day, you need to fly faster to generate the same amount of pressure on the airspeed indicator.

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Ready For Summer Flying? Here Are 6 Questions To Test Your Mettle

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You scored %. These questions were tough - keep studying and you'll ace them next time!

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Ready For Summer Flying? Here Are 6 Questions To Test Your Mettle

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Ready For Summer Flying? Here Are 6 Questions To Test Your Mettle

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