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Quiz: Can You Answer These 6 Airspace Questions?

Ready? Let's get started.


  1. 1) Do you need a transponder to operate into the Northwest Florida airport?

    You don't need a transponder to operate in Class D airspace. And when the airport flips over to Class E airspace at night, you don't need a transponder then, either.

    You don't need a transponder to operate in Class D airspace. And when the airport flips over to Class E airspace at night, you don't need a transponder then, either.

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  2. 2) What airspace are you in here (blue arrow) at 300' AGL?

    The magenta ring means Class E airspace starts at 700 feet AGL. Below it is Class G.

    The magenta ring means Class E airspace starts at 700 feet AGL. Below it is Class G.

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  3. 3) What type of airspace is Lake City Airport (KLCQ) at the surface?

    Lake City is Class G airspace at the surface.

    Lake City is Class G airspace at the surface.

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  4. 4) Does Lake City Airport have a control tower?

    Believe it or not, this Class G airport has a control tower. You can tell because the airport is marked in blue. While rare, some Class E and G airports have control towers, due to unique circumstances. In this case, Lake City has a lot of transient military aircraft that fly through and refuel.

    Believe it or not, this Class G airport has a control tower. You can tell because the airport is marked in blue. While rare, some Class E and G airports have control towers, due to unique circumstances. In this case, Lake City has a lot of transient military aircraft that fly through and refuel.

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  5. 5) What airspace is here (blue arrow) at 18,000 feet MSL?

    Class A airspace starts at 18,000 feet over the entire Contiguous United States.

    Class A airspace starts at 18,000 feet over the entire Contiguous United States.

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  6. 6) If you were flying here at 4,000 feet MSL, what airspace would you be in?

    The Class D airspace for Deer Valley airport goes up to, but not including, 4,000 feet  MSL- it's marked as (-40). Class B starts at 6,000 feet. Everything in between is Class E.

    The Class D airspace for Deer Valley airport goes up to, but not including, 4,000 feet  MSL- it's marked as (-40). Class B starts at 6,000 feet. Everything in between is Class E.

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Not bad, just keep studying your airspace...

You scored %. You've had your shot. Now pass it on so everyone else can try it.


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You've got this airspace down...for the most part.

Nice - you scored % You've had your shot. Now pass it on so everyone else can try it.


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Well, it looks like you're pretty much an airspace expert.

Nicely done - you scored % You've had your shot. Now pass it on so everyone else can try it.


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Colin Cutler

Colin is a Boldmethod co-founder, pilot and graphic artist. He's been a flight instructor at the University of North Dakota, an airline pilot on the CRJ-200, and has directed development of numerous commercial and military training systems. You can reach him at colin@boldmethod.com.

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