To: (Separate email addresses with commas)
From: (Your email address)
Message: (Optional)
Send
Cancel

Thanks!

Close

Quiz: Can You Identify These 7 Cloud Formations?

Live from the Flight Deck

Good luck!


  1. 1) Looks like you're not flying today. What are these clouds?
    Wikipedia

    That's right, this is a cumulonimbus mammatus cloud, and there's probably a lot of turbulence in there too.

    This is a cumulonimbus mammatus cloud, and there's probably a lot of turbulence in there too.

    1. 1-1
      Unchecked Checked
    2. 1-2
      Unchecked Checked
    3. 1-3
      Unchecked Checked
    1. 1-4
      Unchecked Checked
    2. 1-5
      Unchecked Checked
    3. 1-6
      Unchecked Checked
  2. 2) You get to the airport and see this cloud. What is it?
    Jim Brickett

    That's right, this is a towering cumulus cloud.

    This is a towering cumulus cloud.

    1. 2-1
      Unchecked Checked
    2. 2-2
      Unchecked Checked
    3. 2-3
      Unchecked Checked
    1. 2-4
      Unchecked Checked
    2. 2-5
      Unchecked Checked
    3. 2-6
      Unchecked Checked
  3. 3) What's this cloud over the city?
    Wikipedia

    It's a lenticular cloud. And it's the result of air rising and cooling, forming a cloud, then sinking and warming, which is why the cloud appears to be 'hovering' over a specific area.

    It's a lenticular cloud. And it's the result of air rising and cooling, forming a cloud, then sinking and warming, which is why the cloud appears to be 'hovering' over a specific area.

    1. 3-1
      Unchecked Checked
    2. 3-2
      Unchecked Checked
    3. 3-3
      Unchecked Checked
    1. 3-4
      Unchecked Checked
    2. 3-5
      Unchecked Checked
    3. 3-6
      Unchecked Checked
  4. 4) You see this on top of a volcanic ash cloud. What is it?
    Wikipedia

    That's right, this is a pileus cloud, and it's formed by strong updrafts at lower altitudes.

    This is a pileus cloud, and it's formed by strong updrafts at lower altitudes.

    1. 4-1
      Unchecked Checked
    2. 4-2
      Unchecked Checked
    3. 4-3
      Unchecked Checked
    1. 4-4
      Unchecked Checked
    2. 4-5
      Unchecked Checked
    3. 4-6
      Unchecked Checked
  5. 5) You look up and see these clouds. What the heck are they?
    NCAR

    These are called Kelvin-Helmholtz waves. They form when two layers of air (or liquid) of different densities move past each other at different speeds, creating a shear at the boundary.

    These are called Kelvin-Helmholtz waves. They form when two layers of air (or liquid) of different densities move past each other at different speeds, creating a shear at the boundary.

    1. 5-1
      Unchecked Checked
    2. 5-2
      Unchecked Checked
    3. 5-3
      Unchecked Checked
    1. 5-4
      Unchecked Checked
    2. 5-5
      Unchecked Checked
    3. 5-6
      Unchecked Checked
  6. 6) You see these clouds high in the sky. What are they?
    Wikipedia

    That's right, these are cirrus clouds, and they're made mostly of ice crystals.

    These are cirrus clouds, and they're made mostly of ice crystals.

    1. 6-1
      Unchecked Checked
    2. 6-2
      Unchecked Checked
    3. 6-3
      Unchecked Checked
    1. 6-4
      Unchecked Checked
    2. 6-5
      Unchecked Checked
    3. 6-6
      Unchecked Checked
  7. 7) You're flying a polar crossing and you see these clouds at twilight. What are they?
    Wikipedia

    Noctilucent clouds are formed by ice clouds at the boundary of the Earth's atmosphere, about 50 miles high in the sky. These clouds are visible well after the sun has set because of their extreme altitude (the sun can still shine on them far above our own horizon line), and they're typically seen above 50 degrees latitude on the North and South poles. 

    Noctilucent clouds are formed by ice clouds at the boundary of the Earth's atmosphere, about 50 miles high in the sky. These clouds are visible well after the sun has set because of their extreme altitude (the sun can still shine on them far above our own horizon line), and they're typically seen above 50 degrees latitude on the North and South poles. 

    1. 7-1
      Unchecked Checked
    2. 7-2
      Unchecked Checked
    3. 7-3
      Unchecked Checked
    1. 7-4
      Unchecked Checked
    2. 7-5
      Unchecked Checked
    3. 7-6
      Unchecked Checked

Well, you have some room for improvement...

You scored %. Better luck next time.

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
Pic

Nice work.

You scored %. Not bad.

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
Pic

Looks like you pretty much know it all...

You scored %. Well done!

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
Pic

Colin Cutler

Colin is a Boldmethod co-founder, pilot and graphic artist. He's been a flight instructor at the University of North Dakota, an airline pilot on the CRJ-200, and has directed development of numerous commercial and military training systems. You can reach him at colin@boldmethod.com.

Images Courtesy:

Recommended Stories

Latest Stories

    Load More
    Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share via Email