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Are These VFR Scenarios Right, or Wrong?

Right...or wrong?


  1. 1) You're approaching Atmore (0R1) at 1,600' MSL during the day when you see some clouds up ahead that are reported at 2,300' AGL. Because it's a VFR day, you know that the highest altitude you can fly beneath these clouds is approximately 1,800 MSL. Is this right or wrong?

    In Class E airspace, above 1,200' AGL but below 10,000' MSL during the day, the cloud clearance requirements is 500' below, 1,000' above, and 2,000' horizontal. Because clouds bases in AWOS/ATIS are always given in AGL you must convert AGL to MSL by applying field elevation. 2,300' AGL + 286' MSL = 2,586' MSL. Since you have to be at least 500' below clouds, you should subtract 500' from 2,586' MSL. 2,586' MSL - 500 = 2,086'. This is the highest altitude you can fly below the clouds VFR. 

    In Class E airspace, above 1,200' AGL but below 10,000' MSL during the day, the cloud clearance requirements is 500' below, 1,000' above, and 2,000' horizontal. Because clouds bases in AWOS/ATIS are always given in AGL you must convert AGL to MSL by applying field elevation. 2,300' AGL + 286' MSL = 2,586' MSL. Since you have to be at least 500' below clouds, you should subtract 500' from 2,586' MSL. 2,586' MSL - 500 = 2,086'. This is the highest altitude you can fly below the clouds VFR. 

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  2. 2) You're preflighting a Cessna 172. You check the aircraft's maintenance logbooks during preflight and see that the last 100 hour inspection was completed at 2310.4 hours, and it is currently at 2,405.8 hours. The aircraft is used for commercial operations, so it needs a 100 hour inspection. Maintenance isn't available to do the inspection, so you cancel the flight because the aircraft needs the inspection. Is this right or wrong?
    wiltshirespotter

    The aircraft is still airworthy for another 4.6 hours. After this, the aircraft may only be flown to an airport that has maintenance, and is able to perform the 100 hour inspection. The 100-hour limitation can not be exceeded by more than 10 hours while en route to reach a place where the inspection can be done. And, the excess time used to reach a place where the inspection can be done must be included in computing the next 100 hours of time in service.

    The aircraft is still airworthy for another 4.6 hours. After this, the aircraft may only be flown to an airport that has maintenance, and is able to perform the 100 hour inspection. The 100-hour limitation can not be exceeded by more than 10 hours while en route to reach a place where the inspection can be done. And, the excess time used to reach a place where the inspection can be done must be included in computing the next 100 hours of time in service.

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  3. 3) You are descending in your carbureted Cessna 152 when you notice the engine starts to run rough. You realized you forgot to apply carb heat so you turn on the carb heat. When you do, the engine runs worse than before. Despite an increase in the roughness of the engine, you don't turn carb heat off because you know it will improve over time. Is this right or wrong?
    Joao Carlos Medau

    When you encounter carburetor icing, applying carb heat will cause the ice in the carburetor to start melting, sending ice and water through the engine. This will cause the engine to run rough momentarily, until the carburetor is clear of ice. 

    When you encounter carburetor icing, applying carb heat will cause the ice in the carburetor to start melting, sending ice and water through the engine. This will cause the engine to run rough momentarily, until the carburetor is clear of ice. 

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  4. 4) You are in your Gulfstream G650 at 5,500' MSL south of Swanson (2W3), flying northbound. You are at 230 KIAS, so you pull the thrust levers back because you know you have to be at or below 200 KIAS when you are under the Class B shelf. Is this right or wrong?

    According to 91.117, no aircraft underlying a Class B airspace area may be traveling faster than 200 KIAS. Because you are at 230 KIAS near Swanson Airport, you would need to start decelerating to meet this restriction.

    According to 91.117, no aircraft underlying a Class B airspace area may be traveling faster than 200 KIAS. Because you are at 230 KIAS near Swanson Airport, you would need to start decelerating to meet this restriction.

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  5. 5) You're in your Cessna 172 about 5 miles south of the Dells VOR. You're maintaining a heading of 360 and and have the 180-degree radial tuned in with a FROM flag. You turn to a heading of 030 and notice the CDI needle move to the left. Is this right or wrong?

    Because you are reverse sensing in this scenario, flying to the station with a FROM indication, a turn to 030 would cause the needle to deflect to the right.

    Because you are reverse sensing in this scenario, flying to the station with a FROM indication, a turn to 030 would cause the needle to deflect to the right.

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  6. 6) You're in a Piper Arrow that's equipped with a controllable pitch, constant speed propeller. You are cruising with the propeller set to 2500 RPM. You apply an additional 5 inches of manifold pressure, and when you do so, the propeller increases pitch to maintain 2500 RPM. Is this right or wrong?
    Anna Zvereva

    Since a constant speed propeller will maintain the desired RPM, as you increase manifold pressure, the propeller will increase in pitch, to maintain 2500 RPM. 

    Since a constant speed propeller will maintain the desired RPM, as you increase manifold pressure, the propeller will increase in pitch, to maintain 2500 RPM. 

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You're a little rusty...

You scored %. But think about how much you've learned in the last few minutes!

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Nice work, you have most of these scenarios down.

You scored %. Well done.

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Nailed it!

You scored %. Well done.

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Corey Komarec

Corey is a commercial aviation student, Certified Flight Instructor and commercial pilot with multi-engine and instrument ratings at the University of North Dakota. He has been flying since 16 years old, and is pursuing a career in the airlines. You can reach him at corey@boldmethod.com.

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