To: (Separate email addresses with commas)
From: (Your email address)
Message: (Optional)
Send
Cancel

Thanks!

Close

6 Questions To See How Much You Know About Flight Instruments

Boldmethod

Let's get this started...


  1. 1) In a gyro-driven attitude indicator, if you rapidly accelerate with a level pitch attitude:

    As you rapidly accelerate, precession on the gyro can cause the pitch attitude to briefly increase a few degrees.  The change doesn't last long, though, because the erecting system quickly compensates.

    As you rapidly accelerate, precession on the gyro can cause the pitch attitude to briefly increase a few degrees.  The change doesn't last long, though, because the erecting system quickly compensates.

    1. 2-3
      Unchecked Checked
    2. 2-4
      Unchecked Checked
    1. 2-1
      Unchecked Checked
    2. 2-2
      Unchecked Checked
  2. 2) Your pitot tube ices over, sealing the inlet and the drain, but your static ports remain clear. In a constant airspeed climb, your airspeed indicator will:

    Your airspeed will increase.  The airspeed indicator measures ram pressure (from the pitot tube) against static pressure (from the static ports).  The greater the pressure difference, the faster the airspeed.  If your pitot tube completely ices over, the ram pressure becomes trapped and won't change.  However, as you climb, your static pressure decreases. That increases the pressure differential in the airspeed indicator, causing the airspeed to slowly increase.

    Your airspeed will increase.  The airspeed indicator measures ram pressure (from the pitot tube) against static pressure (from the static ports).  The greater the pressure difference, the faster the airspeed.  If your pitot tube completely ices over, the ram pressure becomes trapped and won't change.  However, as you climb, your static pressure decreases. That increases the pressure differential in the airspeed indicator, causing the airspeed to slowly increase.

    1. 1-1
      Unchecked Checked
    2. 1-2
      Unchecked Checked
    1. 1-3
      Unchecked Checked
    2. 1-4
      Unchecked Checked
  3. 3) Calibrated airspeed corrects indicated airspeed for:

    Calibrated airspeed corrects indicated airspeed for position and installation errors.  Equivalent airspeed (EAS) factors in compressibility, and true airspeed (TAS) factors in non-standard pressure and temperature.

    Calibrated airspeed corrects indicated airspeed for position and installation errors.  Equivalent airspeed (EAS) factors in compressibility, and true airspeed (TAS) factors in non-standard pressure and temperature.

    1. 3-1
      Unchecked Checked
    2. 3-2
      Unchecked Checked
    1. 3-3
      Unchecked Checked
    2. 3-4
      Unchecked Checked
  4. 4) The instrument below is a:

    This is a Horizontal Situation Indicator, which overlays navigation information on a heading indicator.  Electronic flight displays can emulate an HSI, and you can still find them on older transport and business aircraft.

    This is a Horizontal Situation Indicator, which overlays navigation information on a heading indicator.  Electronic flight displays can emulate an HSI, and you can still find them on older transport and business aircraft.

    1. 4-1
      Unchecked Checked
    2. 4-2
      Unchecked Checked
    1. 4-3
      Unchecked Checked
    2. 6-3
      Unchecked Checked
  5. 5) You are in the Northern Hemisphere, flying north, and you start a turn toward the east. Your magnetic compass will:

    In the Northern Hemisphere, "dip error" causes your magnetic compass to lag behind the turn on northerly headings, and lead the turn on southerly headings.  The error's strength varies by heading.  The largest affect occurs when turning through north or south.  Dip error doesn't affect the compass when turning through east or west.

    In the Northern Hemisphere, "dip error" causes your magnetic compass to lag behind the turn on northerly headings, and lead the turn on southerly headings.  The error's strength varies by heading.  The largest affect occurs when turning through north or south.  Dip error doesn't affect the compass when turning through east or west.

    1. 5-1
      Unchecked Checked
    2. 5-2
      Unchecked Checked
    1. 5-3
      Unchecked Checked
    2. 5-4
      Unchecked Checked
  6. 6) The instrument below is a:

    This is an RMI, or a Radio Magnetic Indicator.  It displays your relative bearing to a radio station, including VORs and NDBs, overlaid on a heading indicator.  You can still find RMIs on older general aviation and transport category aircraft. Many electronic flight displays emulate their functionality through bearing pointers.

    This is an RMI, or a Radio Magnetic Indicator.  It displays your relative bearing to a radio station, including VORs and NDBs, overlaid on a heading indicator.  You can still find RMIs on older general aviation and transport category aircraft. Many electronic flight displays emulate their functionality through bearing pointers.

    1. 6-1
      Unchecked Checked
    2. 6-2
      Unchecked Checked
    1. 6-3
      Unchecked Checked
    2. 6-4
      Unchecked Checked

Well, it's probably time to read up on the Instrument Flying Handbook...

Your score: %

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
Pic

Not bad. Just keep the pitot heat on...

Your score: %

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
Pic

Looks like you pretty much know it all.

Your score: % Nice work.

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
Pic

Thinking about becoming a pilot? Get started with Lift Academy, and find out what it takes to start your aviation career here.


Colin Cutler

Colin is a Boldmethod co-founder, pilot and graphic artist. He's been a flight instructor at the University of North Dakota, an airline pilot on the CRJ-200, and has directed development of numerous commercial and military training systems. You can reach him at colin@boldmethod.com.

Images Courtesy:

Recommended Stories

Latest Stories

    Load More
    Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share via Email