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Test Your Knowledge On IFR Regulations With These 6 Questions

Boldmethod

Don't get a violation. See if you know all 6!


  1. 1) You're flying your friend's newly purchased aircraft with full fuel. ATC instructs you to hold at a fix 200 miles from your destination and your alternate is an additional 50 nm from there. Upon reaching the hold, you have 53 gallons of fuel available, an average ground speed of 100 knots and fuel burn of 10 gal/hr. How long can you hold until you have 32.5 gallons remaining?

    Fuel requirements under IFR require you to have enough fuel to go to your designation, to your furthest alternate and thereafter at normal cruise speeds for 45 minutes . At 100 knots groundspeed and a fuel flow of 10 gal/hour, you need 20 gallons to get to your destination, 5 gallons to get to your alternate and 7.5 gallons for the 45 minute reserve. The sum of these values gives you 32.5 gallons. Your total fuel available (53 gallons) minus 32.5 gallons gives you 20.5 which equates to just over 2 hours worth of holding time.

    Fuel requirements under IFR require you to have enough fuel to go to your designation, to your furthest alternate and thereafter at normal cruise speeds for 45 minutes . At 100 knots groundspeed and a fuel flow of 10 gal/hour, you need 20 gallons to get to your destination, 5 gallons to get to your alternate and 7.5 gallons for the 45 minute reserve. The sum of these values gives you 32.5 gallons. Your total fuel available (53 gallons) minus 32.5 gallons gives you 20.5 which equates to just over 2 hours worth of holding time.

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  2. 2) You are holding short of Runway 23 at Waukegan Regional (KUGN) and ATC says "Cessna 1234N, fly heading of 270, cleared for takeoff runway 23". When do you start turning to the heading of 270?

    Under IFR, turns are not permitted until you are above 400' AGL.

    Under IFR, turns are not permitted until you are above 400' AGL.

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  3. 3) You and your business partner just bought a new G500 for your company and are flying it back to your hometown. You are cruising at 15,000' at 325 knots when ATC asks you to hold. How long does your inbound leg need to be and how much do you need to slow down?

    Above 14,000', the leg needs to be timed at 1.5 minutes and the maximum holding speed at this altitude is 265 knots.

    Above 14,000', the leg needs to be timed at 1.5 minutes and the maximum holding speed at this altitude is 265 knots.

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  4. 4) You are flying to Pensacola, FL (KPNS) and the weather there is forecasted to be 1,000' overcast at the time of arrival. Your filed alternate is Apalachicola, FL (KAAF). They have 6 GPS approaches with LPV minimums and 1 NDB approach. What does the weather need to be at the ETA here in order to file this airport as an alternate? (airport has standard alternate minimums)

    While GPS approaches that have LPV minimums offer vertical guidance, they are still non-precision approaches. So, the weather needs to be at least 800' ceilings and 2 sm visibility at the ETA.

    While GPS approaches that have LPV minimums offer vertical guidance, they are still non-precision approaches. So, the weather needs to be at least 800' ceilings and 2 sm visibility at the ETA.

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  5. 5) You had to go missed in Pensacola, FL and you are getting established on the RNAV (GPS) 24 into Apalachicola, FL (KAAF). You are cleared for the approach and just passed ONBOE at 2,300' waiting for the glide path to come in. ATC reports that their radar just went down due to an electrical surge from a nearby storm. What now?
    View Jeppesen Chart
    View FAA Chart

    When you are not within radar contact on an approach, you need to make sure you let ATC know when you pass the final approach fix inbound.

    When you are not within radar contact on an approach, you need to make sure you let ATC know when you pass the final approach fix inbound.

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  6. 6) You waited out the bad weather in Apalachicola and decide to try and fly back to Pensacola in a few hours. You are in a SR-22T and filled direct, a 6,000' and 170 KTAS. While enroute, you notice your TAS is 180 knots, even at the power setting you had planned. What do you need to do?

    One of the required reports under IFR is if your filed true airspeed is different by 5% or 10 knots, you must inform ATC to update the speed. Because 180 knots is greater than 5% or 10 knots faster, you need to let ATC so know so they can update your flight plan.

    One of the required reports under IFR is if your filed true airspeed is different by 5% or 10 knots, you must inform ATC to update the speed. Because 180 knots is greater than 5% or 10 knots faster, you need to let ATC so know so they can update your flight plan.

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It wasn't your best flight...

You scored %. It's time to hit the books.

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Not the smoothest flight ever...

You scored %. Time for a little review.

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Not bad...

You scored %. That was impressive.

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Corey Komarec

Corey is a commercial aviation student, CFII and commercial pilot with multi-engine and instrument ratings at the University of North Dakota. Corey has been flying since he was 16, and he's pursuing a career in the airlines. You can reach him at corey@boldmethod.com.

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