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Quiz: 6 Questions To See How Much You Know About Flying VFR Cross Countries

Boldmethod

KOKC is the home of the FAA. Will they be happy with your decision making on this flight?


  1. 1) You are parked at the ramp at Dallas Love (KDAL). You tune the ATIS frequency to get the weather: "Dallas Love Information Delta, Time 1055Z, winds 150 at 14, visibility 2 miles, sky conditions broken at 3,000, temperature 28, dew point 26, altimeter 29.90, landing runway 13R, departing runways 13L and 13R, read back all hold short instructions, advise on initial contact you have Delta" Can you legally depart VFR?

    In Class Bravo airspace, the basic VFR weather minimums require you to have at least 3 SM visibility, and you must remain clear of the clouds. And in this Class B, Special VFR isn't allowed (it's marked right above the field name on the chart)

    In Class Bravo airspace, the basic VFR weather minimums require you to have at least 3 SM visibility, and you must remain clear of the clouds. And in this Class B, Special VFR isn't allowed (it's marked right above the field name on the chart)

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  2. 2) You decide to wait another hour for departure. The clouds are now 6,600 feet overcast and the visibility 10 miles. Dallas Love field elevation is 487' MSL. You depart north on a 340 heading and begin climbing to your cruise altitude. What is the approximate highest altitude you are permitted to cruise at VFR throughout the flight?

    The latest ATIS information stated that clouds were 6,600 overcast. This value is given in AGL, so you add field elevation at Dallas Love, which is 487 ft., to get an MSL altitude of 7,087 ft. In Class Bravo airspace you need to remain clear of clouds, but for the majority of our flight, you must maintain an altitude that will permit 500 ft. protection below the clouds. Subtracting 500 ft. gives you 6,587 ft. You will be above 3,000 ft. MSL, so you need to consider VFR cruising altitude applications. You are on a magnetic course that falls in between 180 and 359 degrees so need to choose an even thousand-foot altitude plus 500 feet.  That cruising altitude happens to be 6,500 ft.

    The latest ATIS information stated that clouds were 6,600 overcast. This value is given in AGL, so you add field elevation at Dallas Love, which is 487 ft., to get an MSL altitude of 7,087 ft. In Class Bravo airspace you need to remain clear of clouds, but for the majority of our flight, you must maintain an altitude that will permit 500 ft. protection below the clouds. Subtracting 500 ft. gives you 6,587 ft. You will be above 3,000 ft. MSL, so you need to consider VFR cruising altitude applications. You are on a magnetic course that falls in between 180 and 359 degrees so need to choose an even thousand-foot altitude plus 500 feet.  That cruising altitude happens to be 6,500 ft.

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  3. 3) You are just east of Lakeview (30F) climbing through 2,000 ft. when ATC says "332RT radar services terminated, remain clear of the Dallas Fort Worth Class Bravo, maintain VFR, frequency change approved." What altitude does the shelf of the Dallas Class Bravo start at above you?

    The Dallas Class Bravo airspace just east of Lakeview (30F) starts at 3,000'. The blue bold text that means that the base starts at 3,000' MSL and extends up to 11,000' MSL

    The Dallas Class Bravo airspace just east of Lakeview (30F) starts at 3,000'. The blue bold text that means that the base starts at 3,000' MSL and extends up to 11,000' MSL

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  4. 4) You are now over the town of Wynnewood at 6,500' MSL. What speed must you not exceed?

    Under 10,000' MSL you must not exceed an indicated airspeed of 250 knots.

    Under 10,000' MSL you must not exceed an indicated airspeed of 250 knots.

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  5. 5) The ceilings are dropping as you approach OKC from the south, and you're now at 3,500' MSL. You tune in the ATIS: "Oklahoma City Information Charlie, time 1154Z, winds 140 at 18KTS, visibility 4 miles, sky condition overcast at 3,500, temperature 29, dew point 25, altimeter 29.87, landing runway 17R, taking off runway 17R and 17L, read back all hold short instructions, advise on initial contact you have Charlie". Can you legally enter Oklahoma City's airspace under VFR?

    In Class Charlie, the VFR weather minimums are 3 miles visibility, 500 ft. below clouds, 1,000 ft. above, and 2,000 ft. horizontal. Since the visibility is above 3 SM, you would simply need to stay at least 500 ft. below the clouds.

    In Class Charlie, the VFR weather minimums are 3 miles visibility, 500 ft. below clouds, 1,000 ft. above, and 2,000 ft. horizontal. Since the visibility is above 3 SM, you would simply need to stay at least 500 ft. below the clouds.

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  6. 6) You are approaching the Oklahoma City Class Charlie airspace from the south. How far out do they want you to contact approach?

    Oklahoma City approach requests you to contact approach within 20NM as denoted in the white approach frequency box southwest of the airport.

    Oklahoma City approach requests you to contact approach within 20NM as denoted in the white approach frequency box southwest of the airport.

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You definitely had to work hard on this flight.

You scored %. Spend some time studying, and you'll be ready for this cross-country in no time.

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You definitely had to work hard on this flight.

You scored % Not bad.

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Nice work.

Nicely done, you scored %

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Corey Komarec

Corey is a commercial aviation student, CFII and commercial pilot with multi-engine and instrument ratings at the University of North Dakota. Corey has been flying since he was 16, and he's pursuing a career in the airlines. You can reach him at corey@boldmethod.com.

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