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Quiz: 6 Questions To See How Much You Know About Aerodynamics

Boldmethod

Good luck!


  1. 1) Which of the following is NOT one of the 4 forces that act on an aircraft in straight-and-level, unaccelerated flight?

    The four forces acting on an aircraft in straight-and-level, unaccelerated flight are thrust, drag, lift, and weight.

    The four forces acting on an aircraft in straight-and-level, unaccelerated flight are thrust, drag, lift, and weight.

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  2. 2) The acute angle between the chord line of the wing and the direction of the relative wind is the _____.

    The acute angle between the chord line of the wing and the direction of the relative wind is called the angle of attack. 

    The acute angle between the chord line of the wing and the direction of the relative wind is called the angle of attack. 

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  3. 3) In straight-and-level, unaccelerated flight, the sum of opposing forces acting on the aircraft is always _____.

    In steady flight, the sum of thrust, drag, weight, and lift is always zero. There can be no unbalanced forces in steady, straight flight based upon Newton's Third Law. Note: this does not mean the four forces are equal. It means the opposing forces are equal to and thereby cancel the effects of each other. 

    In steady flight, the sum of thrust, drag, weight, and lift is always zero. There can be no unbalanced forces in steady, straight flight based upon Newton's Third Law. Note: this does not mean the four forces are equal. It means the opposing forces are equal to and thereby cancel the effects of each other. 

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  4. 4) If you load an aircraft tail-heavy, the center of gravity (CG) will be aft and the nose will more easily pitch ___ than if it were in a forward loading configuration.

    When an aircraft is configured with an aft load, the nose will pitch upward more easily.

    When an aircraft is configured with an aft load, the nose will pitch upward more easily.

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  5. 5) Lowering flaps increases _____.

    Lowering flaps increases camber, lift and drag.

    Lowering flaps increases camber, lift and drag.

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  6. 6) A wing is typically designed to stall from ___ to ___, resulting in more effective aileron control during the stall.

    Typically, a wing is designed to stall from root to tip, resulting in more effective aileron control during the stall.

    Typically, a wing is designed to stall from root to tip, resulting in more effective aileron control during the stall.

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You know a thing or two about aerodynamics!

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Corey Komarec

Corey is a commercial aviation student, CFII and commercial pilot with multi-engine and instrument ratings at the University of North Dakota. Corey has been flying since he was 16, and he's pursuing a career in the airlines. You can reach him at corey@boldmethod.com.

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