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Quiz: Can You Answer These 7 IFR Checkride Questions?

Boldmethod

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  1. 1) How often does your static pressure system need to be inspected for IFR flight?

    According to FAR 91.411, your static pressure system needs to be checked within the preceding 24 calendar months for IFR flight.

    According to FAR 91.411, your static pressure system needs to be checked within the preceding 24 calendar months for IFR flight.

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  2. 2) How often does your ELT need to be inspected for IFR flight?

    According to FAR 91.207, your ELT needs to be inspected within 12 calendar months.

    According to FAR 91.207, your ELT needs to be inspected within 12 calendar months.

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  3. 3) How often does your transponder need to be inspected for IFR flight?

    According to FAR 91.413, your transponder needs to be checked within the preceding 24 calendar months.

    According to FAR 91.413, your transponder needs to be checked within the preceding 24 calendar months.

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  4. 4) How often does your VOR(s) need to be checked for IFR flight?

    According to FAR 91.171, your VOR needs to be checked within the preceding 30 days for IFR flight.

    According to FAR 91.171, your VOR needs to be checked within the preceding 30 days for IFR flight.

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  5. 5) When do you need to file an alternate?

    According to FAR 91.169, from 1 hour before to 1 hour after your intended landing, if the ceilings are less than 2,000' or the visibility is less than 3SM, you'll need an alternate.

    According to FAR 91.169, from 1 hour before to 1 hour after your intended landing, if the ceilings are less than 2,000' or the visibility is less than 3SM, you'll need an alternate.

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  6. 6) How much fuel reserve do you need when you reach your intended landing airport, if you didn't need to file an alternate?

    According to FAR 91.167, as long as the ceilings are forecast to be at least 2,000 feet, and the visibility at least 3 SM (no alternate required), you need 45 minutes of fuel reserve after reaching your first airport of intended landing.

    According to FAR 91.167, as long as the ceilings are forecast to be at least 2,000 feet, and the visibility at least 3 SM (no alternate required), you need 45 minutes of fuel reserve after reaching your first airport of intended landing.

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  7. 7) Which of these instruments are not required for IFR flight?

    According to 91.205, all of these instruments, except the VSI, are required.

    According to 91.205, all of these instruments, except the VSI, are required.

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You could use a little work before your instrument checkride...

You scored %. But think about how much you just learned!

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Not bad, you're almost ready for your instrument checkride.

You scored %. Well done.

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You've got this instrument checkride down!

Nice - you scored %. Well done.

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Colin Cutler

Colin is a Boldmethod co-founder, pilot and graphic artist. He's been a flight instructor at the University of North Dakota, an airline pilot on the CRJ-200, and has directed development of numerous commercial and military training systems. You can reach him at colin@boldmethod.com.

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