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Quiz: Could You Pass A Commercial Checkride Today?

Live from the Flight Deck

Could you pass a commercial checkride today?


  1. 1) You have a commercial pilot certificate, and you work for a local FBO (no 135 certificates). Your boss asks you to use the FBO's Cessna 182 to bring a local government official to a meeting. Can you accept the flight?

    This scenario is known as a wet lease. A wet lease is an operation where the pilot and plane come from the same source (the FBO). Since the company doesn't have a 135 certificate for air carrier operations, you would not be able to legally accept this flight.

    This scenario is known as a wet lease. A wet lease is an operation where the pilot and plane come from the same source (the FBO). Since the company doesn't have a 135 certificate for air carrier operations, you would not be able to legally accept this flight.

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  2. 2) You have loss of oil pressure in a single engine, constant speed propeller aircraft. After you lose oil pressure, the propeller moves to...

    A sudden loss of oil pressure in a single engine, constant speed propeller airplane will cause the propeller to move to a low pitch, high RPM position.

    A sudden loss of oil pressure in a single engine, constant speed propeller airplane will cause the propeller to move to a low pitch, high RPM position.

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  3. 3) You're flying from Pensacola Int'l (KPNS) to Sikes (KCEW) at 5,500' MSL in a Piper Seminole. Your ground speed is roughly 160 knots, and the traffic pattern altitude is 1,200' MSL. What is your top-of-descent, and what FPM descent rate will you maintain using the 3-6 rule?

    Using the 3-6 rule, altitude to lose in thousands of feet, multiplied by 3 will give you top-of-descent (5,500' - 1,200' = 4,300/1,000' = 4.3 x 3 = 13 NM). For the descent rate in FPM, you will maintain your groundspeed multiplied by 6 (160 x 6 = 960 FPM).

    Using the 3-6 rule, altitude to lose in thousands of feet, multiplied by 3 will give you top-of-descent (5,500' - 1,200' = 4,300/1,000' = 4.3 x 3 = 13 NM). For the descent rate in FPM, you will maintain your groundspeed multiplied by 6 (160 x 6 = 960 FPM).

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  4. 4) You have a commercial pilot certificate, but you don't have an instrument rating. What limitations do you have when flying people/property for compensation/hire?

    If you are flying people or property for compensation or hire, you can't fly at night or, more than 50 NM from the original point of departure without an instrument rating.

    If you are flying people or property for compensation or hire, you can't fly at night or, more than 50 NM from the original point of departure without an instrument rating.

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  5. 5) You're flying an aircraft that can be pressurized up to 10.9 PSI. What cabin altitude does 10.9 PSI give you, and how much pressure is exerted on an aircraft door that's 3 feet x 5 feet?

    Many aircraft pressurize their cabin to around 10.9 PSI, which brings the cabin altitude to 8,000'. To determine the force exerted on a door in flight, convert the dimensions of the door into inches 3'(12 in) x 5'(12 in)= Area of 2,160 square inches. There are 10.9 lbs exerted on a door per square inch. So, 2,160 x 10.9 PSI = 23,544 lbs. That's a lot of force!

    Many aircraft pressurize their cabin to around 10.9 PSI, which brings the cabin altitude to 8,000'. To determine the force exerted on a door in flight, convert the dimensions of the door into inches 3'(12 in) x 5'(12 in)= Area of 2,160 square inches. There are 10.9 lbs exerted on a door per square inch. So, 2,160 x 10.9 PSI = 23,544 lbs. That's a lot of force!

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  6. 6) You and a friend go on a weekend ski trip to Colorado in your SR-22T. Your friend is a pilot and has never been in the flight levels, so you file IFR at FL210. During preflight, you grab two cannulas from the baggage area of the aircraft because of the oxygen requirements above 12,500'. Are you all set to go?

    Unfortunately no. According to FAR 23.1447, cannulas are only approved for flights up to and including 18,000' MSL. If you plan to fly at FL210, you need an oxygen dispensing system that covers your nose and mouth.

    Unfortunately no. According to FAR 23.1447, cannulas are only approved for flights up to and including 18,000' MSL. If you plan to fly at FL210, you need an oxygen dispensing system that covers your nose and mouth.

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That was a tough one...

You scored %. Better luck next time!

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Nice work, you're close to passing your commercial checkride...

You scored %. Well done.

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Nailed it!

You scored % You're definitely passing your checkride.

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Corey Komarec

Corey is a commercial aviation student, CFII and commercial pilot with multi-engine and instrument ratings at the University of North Dakota. Corey has been flying since he was 16, and he's pursuing a career in the airlines. You can reach him at corey@boldmethod.com.

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