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Would You Fly A Learjet 35?

The Learjet 35 took to the skies on August 22nd, 1973. It's known for being a private jet and military transport aircraft (designated the C-21A). Between 1973 and 1994, 738 of the aircraft were produced.

SwayneMartin.com

From a passenger's perspective, they're more than comfortable!

See more of what it's like to fly a Lear 35 in my post on SwayneMartin.com

Angel MedFlight

Pilots love them for their maneuverability, speed and range. A pilot once told me that when he was flying an empty Learjet 35A, he took off, gave the Learjet maximum climb performance, and by the time he crossed the opposite runway threshold was at 6,000 feet AGL! Their iconic wingtip fuel tanks distinguish the plane from many aircraft of the same class.

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Many people don't know that the Learjet 35 was used in active military service by the Escuadron Fenix during the 1982 Falklands War.

Wikipedia

They were used for search and rescue missions, communications assistance, and pathfinder flights for fighter jets due to their navigation systems. The Learjets were even used in 126 sorties, flying day and night to simulate strike aircraft preparing to attack the enemy fleet. On one of these flights, on June 7, an Air Force Learjet was shot down over Pebble Island by a surface-to-air Sea Dart missile fired by HMS Exeter.

Bundeswehr-Fotos Wir.Dienen.Deutschland

The Learjet 35 is about the closest thing you can get to flying onboard a civilian fighter jet, yet with all the luxuries of a private aircraft. I was fortunate to take a flight on a Learjet 35A during a recent internship. Click this link to see what it's like to fly onboard this amazing plane for the first time: Learjet Jumpseat Flight Video.

SwayneMartin.com

So how much do you know about this amazing plane? Answer the questions below and find out!

  1. 1) Which country's military doesn't operate the Learjet 35?

    You got it. Canada does not have any Learjet 35s in military service. 

    Canada does not have any Learjet 35s in military service. 

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  2. 2) What is the Learjet 35A's service ceiling?

    You got it. The Learjet 35A has a service ceiling of 45,000 feet.

    The Learjet 35A has a service ceiling of 45,000 feet.

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  3. 3) How far can the Learjet 35A fly?

    You got it. The Learjet 35A can fly up to 2,056 nautical miles nonstop.

    The Learjet 35A can fly up to 2,056 nautical miles nonstop.

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  4. 4) What is the maximum climb rate of the Learjet 35A?

    You got it. The Learjet 35A can climb at an amazing 8,000 feet per minute.

    The Learjet 35A can climb at an amazing 8,000 feet per minute.

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  5. 5) Would you like to fly the Learjet 35A?

    It's not for everybody, but it's a pretty cool jet.

    It's not for everybody, but it's a pretty cool jet.

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Not bad...

You scored %. Think you know more about Learjets than your friends? Click share and find out!

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Nicely done!

You scored %. You're clearly a Learjet fan, and chances are, you could outsmart your friends with your expansive Learjet knowledge. Click share and find out!

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Want to see more of what it's like to fly a Learjet 35? Check out my post on SwayneMartin.com about my round-trip flight from Richmond to Baltimore in a Lear 35 this summer.


Swayne Martin

Swayne is an editor at Boldmethod, certified flight instructor, and an Embraer 145 First Officer for a regional airline. He graduated as an aviation major from the University of North Dakota in 2018, holds a PIC Type Rating for Cessna Citation Jets (CE-525), and is a former pilot for Mokulele Airlines. He's the author of articles, quizzes and lists on Boldmethod every week. You can reach Swayne at swayne@boldmethod.com, and follow his flying adventures on his YouTube Channel.

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