To: (Separate email addresses with commas)
From: (Your email address)
Message: (Optional)
Send
Cancel

Thanks!

Close

7 Questions To See How Well You Know Aircraft Systems

Boldmethod

How's your systems knowledge?


  1. 1) You're performing an engine run-up before takeoff. You start by turning your ignition switch to "R" and the RPM doesn't drop. You return it to "BOTH" and the RPM remains the same. Next, you turn the ignition to "L" and your engine quits. What happened?

    When you place the ignition switch in the "L" position, you are only running off the left magneto. When you place it in the "R" position, you are only running off the right magneto. So, if the engine quits when you're in the "L" position, you'll know you have a left magneto issue.

    When you place the ignition switch in the "L" position, you are only running off the left magneto. When you place it in the "R" position, you are only running off the right magneto. So, if the engine quits when you're in the "L" position, you'll know you have a left magneto issue.

    1. 1-1
      Unchecked Checked
    2. 1-2
      Unchecked Checked
    1. 1-3
      Unchecked Checked
    2. 1-4
      Unchecked Checked
  2. 2) You are beginning your decent into your home airport. You turn the carburetor heat on and you lose a bit of engine RPM. Why does your engine performance decrease when you turn the carburetor heat on?

    When you turn on carb heat, you introduce hotter, less-dense air into the carburetor. Because you have less air entering the engine, your RPM will decrease.

    When you turn on carb heat, you introduce hotter, less-dense air into the carburetor. Because you have less air entering the engine, your RPM will decrease.

    1. 2-1
      Unchecked Checked
    2. 2-2
      Unchecked Checked
    1. 2-3
      Unchecked Checked
    2. 2-4
      Unchecked Checked
  3. 3) During preflight you add oil to your engine and fill it up to the max fill line. After your flight, you notice the oil level dropped about an inch on the dip stick, and there's residue of oil underneath the engine. Where did this oil come from?

    When you fill the oil to the max fill line, more than likely, a lot of this oil will escape during engine operation through the oil breather. The oil breather is a tube that ventilates the engine casing during operation. This is the same reason why you will find a few drops of oil under the engine occasionally during preflight.

    When you fill the oil to the max fill line, more than likely, a lot of this oil will escape during engine operation through the oil breather. The oil breather is a tube that ventilates the engine casing during operation. This is the same reason why you will find a few drops of oil under the engine occasionally during preflight.

    1. 3-1
      Unchecked Checked
    2. 3-2
      Unchecked Checked
    1. 3-3
      Unchecked Checked
    2. 3-4
      Unchecked Checked
  4. 4) You are on an IFR flight and fly into icing conditions. Your pitot tube ices over but the pitot drain hole and static port remain open. What will your airspeed indicator read?

    The pitot tube is directly linked to the diaphragm inside the airspeed indicator. The static port however, is linked to the casing. When the diaphragm has no ram air entering through the pitot tube to expand it, airspeed drops to zero.

    The pitot tube is directly linked to the diaphragm inside the airspeed indicator. The static port however, is linked to the casing. When the diaphragm has no ram air entering through the pitot tube to expand it, airspeed drops to zero.

    1. 4-1
      Unchecked Checked
    2. 4-2
      Unchecked Checked
    1. 4-3
      Unchecked Checked
    2. 4-4
      Unchecked Checked
  5. 5) What type of flaps allow high pressure air from under the wing to flow over to the leading edge of the flap?

    Slotted flaps create an opening between the wing and the leading edge of the flap. This allows high pressure air from beneath the wing to accelerate over the top of the flap. By doing this, the boundary layer is energized and delays airflow separation.

    Slotted flaps create an opening between the wing and the leading edge of the flap. This allows high pressure air from beneath the wing to accelerate over the top of the flap. By doing this, the boundary layer is energized and delays airflow separation.

    1. 5-1
      Unchecked Checked
    2. 5-2
      Unchecked Checked
    3. 5-3
      Unchecked Checked
  6. 6) While enroute to your destination, you notice the engine oil is getting hot. What could be a possible cause of this?

    High oil temperatures could be the result of low oil level, poor airflow over the engine, and/or excessively lean mixtures.

    High oil temperatures could be the result of low oil level, poor airflow over the engine, and/or excessively lean mixtures.

    1. 6-1
      Unchecked Checked
    2. 6-2
      Unchecked Checked
    1. 6-3
      Unchecked Checked
    2. 6-4
      Unchecked Checked
  7. 7) What is the purpose of anti-servo tabs on stabilators?

    Because a stabilator is such a large control surface, it can be easy to over control. Manufacturers prevent this by adding an anti-servo tab which moves in the same direction as the control surface deflection. Anti-servo tabs also double as a trim tab.

    Because a stabilator is such a large control surface, it can be easy to over control. Manufacturers prevent this by adding an anti-servo tab which moves in the same direction as the control surface deflection. Anti-servo tabs also double as a trim tab.

    Adrian Milliner
    1. 7-1
      Unchecked Checked
    2. 7-2
      Unchecked Checked
    1. 7-3
      Unchecked Checked
    2. 7-4
      Unchecked Checked

Not bad, just keep working at it...

You scored % Better luck next time.

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
Pic

Nice work, you know quite a bit about aircraft systems.

You scored %. Well done.

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
Pic

Nailed it!

You scored % Well done.

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
Pic

Corey Komarec

Corey is a commercial aviation student, Certified Flight Instructor and commercial pilot with multi-engine and instrument ratings at the University of North Dakota. He has been flying since 16 years old, and is pursuing a career in the airlines. You can reach him at corey@boldmethod.com.

Images Courtesy:

Recommended Stories

Latest Stories

    Load More
    Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share via Email