To: (Separate email addresses with commas)
From: (Your email address)
Message: (Optional)
Send
Cancel

Thanks!

Close

Quiz: Are You Prepared To Handle These Aircraft Fires?

Are you ready to handle an aircraft fire? Let's get started...

  1. 1) What's the most common cause of engine fires during start?
    Jason Pineau

    Engine fires on start are most commonly caused by over-priming. When an engine is over-primed, there's too much fuel in the cylinders, which can splash and ignite. 

    Engine fires on start are most commonly caused by over-priming. When an engine is over-primed, there's too much fuel in the cylinders, which can splash and ignite. 

    1. 1-1
      Unchecked Checked
    2. 1-2
      Unchecked Checked
    3. 1-3
      Unchecked Checked
  2. 2) While flying, you smell a faint burning odor, begin to see white smoke in the cabin, and notice that your avionics are malfunctioning. You most likely have an:
    Swayne Martin

    Electrical fires are often first noticed by a faint, acrid burning smell. As the fire progresses, you may begin to notice white smoke enter the cabin. Electrical components often malfunction during an electrical fire.

    Electrical fires are often first noticed by a faint, acrid burning smell. As the fire progresses, you may begin to notice white smoke enter the cabin. Electrical components often malfunction during an electrical fire.

    1. 2-1
      Unchecked Checked
    2. 2-2
      Unchecked Checked
    3. 2-3
      Unchecked Checked
  3. 3) What can you do to keep an engine fire isolated on the other side of the firewall?
    Les Chatfield

    Cabin heat ducting passes through the firewall, into the cabin. Because you're trying to keep the blaze on the engine side of the firewall, most checklists say to shut off the cabin heat.

    Cabin heat ducting passes through the firewall, into the cabin. Because you're trying to keep the blaze on the engine side of the firewall, most checklists say to shut off the cabin heat.

    1. 3-1
      Unchecked Checked
    2. 3-2
      Unchecked Checked
    3. 3-3
      Unchecked Checked
    1. 3-4
      Unchecked Checked
    2. 3-5
      Unchecked Checked
    3. 3-6
      Unchecked Checked
  4. 4) Which of the following is the only fire extinguisher recommended by the FAA for use with aircraft?
    Graeme Maclean

    The FAA strongly recommends the use of portable Halon fire extinguishers in all aircraft. Halon is a liquefied, compressed gas that stops the spread of fire through chemical combustion. It is recommended for aircraft use because it doesn't emit a blinding cloud of dust upon use (dry chemical extinguishers), and it won't damage electrical equipment (CO2 extinguishers).

    The FAA strongly recommends the use of portable Halon fire extinguishers in all aircraft. Halon is a liquefied, compressed gas that stops the spread of fire through chemical combustion. It is recommended for aircraft use because it doesn't emit a blinding cloud of dust upon use (dry chemical extinguishers), and it won't damage electrical equipment (CO2 extinguishers).

    1. 4-1
      Unchecked Checked
    2. 4-2
      Unchecked Checked
    3. 4-3
      Unchecked Checked
  5. 5) How can you tell if you have an oil fire?
    Swayne Martin

    If you have an oil fire, you will probably see thick, black smoke. Check your oil pressure gauge to confirm the leak and fire. 

    If you have an oil fire, you will probably see thick, black smoke. Check your oil pressure gauge to confirm the leak and fire. 

    1. 5-1
      Unchecked Checked
    2. 5-2
      Unchecked Checked
    3. 5-3
      Unchecked Checked
  6. 6) The fire is still burning after you followed the emergency checklist for an engine fire. What's one thing you can do to extinguish the flames?
    Jason Pineau

    Sometimes the emergency procedure for an engine shut-down in the event of a fire may not be adequate. If the fire has spread or burned long and hot, it may be difficult to extinguish. In this case, most POHs recommend a rapid descent. During a rapid descent, a high gliding speed and open cowl flaps may blow the fire out by leaning remaining fuel or oil vapors to an incombustible mixture.

    Sometimes the emergency procedure for an engine shut-down in the event of a fire may not be adequate. If the fire has spread or burned long and hot, it may be difficult to extinguish. In this case, most POHs recommend a rapid descent. During a rapid descent, a high gliding speed and open cowl flaps may blow the fire out by leaning remaining fuel or oil vapors to an incombustible mixture.

    1. 6-1
      Unchecked Checked
    2. 6-2
      Unchecked Checked
    3. 6-3
      Unchecked Checked
  7. 7) To avoid being trapped after a forced landing (dangerous because of post-crash fires), some checklists advise you to ______ before landing.
    John McLinden

    In some aircraft, checklists recommend that you un-latch the doors before a forced landing. This is to negate any airframe warping that could make opening doors difficult. 

    In some aircraft, checklists recommend that you un-latch the doors before a forced landing. This is to negate any airframe warping that could make opening doors difficult. 

    1. 7-1
      Unchecked Checked
    2. 7-2
      Unchecked Checked
    3. 7-3
      Unchecked Checked
    1. 7-4
      Unchecked Checked
    2. 7-5
      Unchecked Checked
    3. 7-6
      Unchecked Checked

So this wasn't your greatest quiz, but we have good news! You have room for improvement...

You scored %. Scroll up to see what you missed. Then pass it on so everyone else can give it a shot.

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
Pic

Looks like you understand aircraft fires pretty well.

You scored %. You've had your shot. Now pass it on so everyone else can try.

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
Pic

Well, you pretty much nailed this quiz.

You scored %. You've had your shot. Now pass it on so everyone else can try.

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
Pic

Swayne Martin

Swayne is an editor at Boldmethod, commercially licensed pilot with multi-engine and instrument ratings, and a commercial aviation student at the University of North Dakota. He's the author of the articles, quizzes and lists you love to read every week. Swayne's experience ranges from international flights in a King Air F90 to ferrying a 1943 Grumman Widgeon across the country. You can reach Swayne at swayne@boldmethod.com, and follow his flying adventures at http://www.swaynemartin.com.

Images Courtesy:

Recommended Stories

Latest Stories

    Load More
    Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share via Email